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  1. Review Essays: Unwarranted Allegations in Unwanted Advances: On Laura Kipnis’s Attack on Title IX

    Long before writing her latest book—Unwanted Advances: Sexual Paranoia Comes to Campus—Northwestern University professor Laura Kipnis made a name for herself as a provocateur known for exposing hypocrisy with humor. Her previous books have been delightfully stinging with a keen eye toward irony and unseen contradictions: politically incorrect in ways that leave the reader tickled. Uncomfortable, but fun.
  2. Review Essays: Intersectionality as Theory and Practice

    Everybody is talking about intersectionality these days. Whether one is out of the loop and wondering what all the fuss is about or in the inner circle and trying to decide whether and how to use it most effectively as a tool, either of the two books reviewed here— Intersectionality: Origins, Contestations, Horizons, by Anna Carastathis, and Intersectionality, by Patricia Hill Collins and Sirma Bilge—will prove an invaluable guide.
  3. Precarious Sexuality: How Men and Women Are Differentially Categorized for Similar Sexual Behavior

    Are men and women categorized differently for similar sexual behavior? Building on theories of gender, sexuality, and status, we introduce the concept of precarious sexuality to suggest that men’s—but not women’s—heterosexuality is an especially privileged identity that is easily lost. We test our hypotheses in a series of survey experiments describing a person who has a sexual experience conflicting with their sexual history.
  4. Perceived Need for Mental Health Care: The Intersection of Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Socioeconomic Status

    Racial/ethnic minority populations underutilize mental health services, even relative to psychiatric disorder, and differences in perceived need may contribute to these disparities. Using the Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiology Surveys, we assessed how the intersections of race/ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status affect perceived need. We analyzed a nationally representative sample of U.S. adults (18years or older; N= 14,906), including non-Latino whites, Asian Americans, Latinos, African Americans, and Afro-Caribbeans.
  5. Logics of Freedom: Debating Religious Freedom Laws and Gay and Lesbian Rights

    In the wake of marriage equality for same-sex couples, many states have introduced and passed laws that provide religious exemptions for certain services and benefits for LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer) persons. The authors use data from a general population survey of Nebraskans as a mixed-methods case study to examine public opinion of religious freedom laws.
  6. Film Review: Facing Fear

    Film Review: Facing Fear
  7. Obscuring Oppression: Racism, Cissexism, and the Persistence of Social Inequality

    This article outlines a generic process in the reproduction of inequality the authors name obscuring oppression.
  8. From Opt Out to Blocked Out: The Challenges for Labor Market Re-entry after Family-Related Employment Lapses

    From Opt Out to Blocked Out: The Challenges for Labor Market Re-entry after Family-Related Employment Lapses
  9. The Condensed Courtship Clock: How Elite Women Manage Self-development and Marriage Ideals

    As elite, heterosexual women delay marriage, complete higher education, and pursue high-status careers, are they able to de-center the other-oriented roles of wife and mother in their lives? Using in-depth interviews with 33 single, college-educated women, the authors examine how elite women balance expectations for self-development and family formation. Participants constructed a timeline with three phases: the self-development phase, the readiness moment, and the push to partner. Women’s initial focus on self-development ends with a shift toward feeling ready to search for a spouse.
  10. Trans: A Response

    I hold Iván Szelényi in the highest esteem. I was therefore surprised to find that his review of my book Trans: Gender and Race in an Age of Unsettled Identities (in the Spring 2017 issue) mischaracterized my argument