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  1. A Fracking Fracas Demonstrates Movement Potential

    A social movement against fracking is scoring victories in some states but not others. Why are some groups finding more success?

  2. RaceBaitR Talks #HistoryByHillary, Queerness

    Steven W. Thrasher and genderqueer activist Hari Ziyad on calling out hypocrisy and fighting racism without engaging racists.

  3. The Organizational Trace of an Insurgent Moment

    The relationship between social movements and formal organizations has long been a concern to scholars of collective action. Many have argued that social movement organizations (SMOs) provide resources that facilitate movement emergence, while others have highlighted the ways in which SMOs institutionalize or coopt movement goals.
  4. Hurricane Flooding and Environmental Inequality: Do Disadvantaged Neighborhoods Have Lower Elevations?

    Most research on environmental inequality studies whether poor and minority neighborhoods are more exposed to environmental hazards in the form of pollution and waste. However, natural disasters, such as hurricanes, and their aftermaths are also important forms of environmental hazards and may disproportionally affect disadvantaged neighborhoods. Using data from Google Maps API and the American Community Survey, this study shows that poor neighborhoods in the Houston area tend to have lower elevations and thus may be more vulnerable to flooding.
  5. Minority Status Distortion and Preference for In-group Ties: Consequences for Social Capital

    To assess residents’ perceptions of social capital (social cohesion, place attachment, and neighboring), the authors create innovative measures of residents’ assessments of neighborhood ethnic minorities and the extent of social ties between members of the same ethnic group compared with chance. The authors use a sample of nearly 10,000 residents nested in 297 neighborhoods in two Australian cities.
  6. Neighborhood Effects on Immigrants’ Experiences of Work-Family Conflict and Psychological Distress

    The neighborhood context is considered a key institution of inequality influencing individuals’ exposure and psychological vulnerability to stressors in the work-family interface, including work-family conflict (WFC). However, experiences of neighborhood context, WFC, and its mental health consequences among minority populations—including foreign-born residents—remain unexplored. We address this limitation and draw on tenants of the stress process model to unpack our hypotheses. We further test whether our focal associations vary for mothers and fathers.
  7. Contexts: Reckoning

    Contexts
    Summer 2017 Vol. 16 No. 3

    Features include "Black Lives and police Tactics Matter", "Who Would Eat Such a Fish", "The Hidden Privilege in "Potty Politics", and "Glory and Gore."

  8. Race, Space, and Surveillance: Understanding the Relationship between Criminal Justice Contact and Institutional Involvement

    Ethnographies of young men of color offer competing theories regarding how individuals react to criminal justice contact. System avoidance theory suggests that black and Latino men in segregated neighborhoods avoid formal institutions because of fear of surveillance, while Rios contends that they frame their criminal justice contact as a racial injustice and become activists. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Adolescent to Adult Health, this study tests these hypotheses.
  9. Beyond Double Movement and Re-regulation: Polanyi, the Organized Denial of Money Politics, and the Promise of Democratization

    Although Karl Polanyi is best known for his theorization of market regulation and the double movement, democratizing the economic was one of his core concerns. He believed societies need to bring labor, land, and money under collective oversight to displace the logic of market fundamentalism with the logic of human needs. In this article, the author draws on Polanyi’s vocabulary to shed light on the denial of money politics and the possibility of democratization.