American Sociological Association

Search

Search

The search found 238 results in 0.024 seconds.

Search results

  1. It Starts Early: Toward a Longitudinal Analysis of Interracial Intimacy

    Researchers regard interracial intimacy as a mechanism for integration because of the assumption that the partners come from distinct social worlds (e.g., racially homogeneous friendship networks).
  2. The Mark of a Woman’s Record: Gender and Academic Performance in Hiring

    Women earn better grades than men across levels of education—but to what end? This article assesses whether men and women receive equal returns to academic performance in hiring. I conducted an audit study by submitting 2,106 job applications that experimentally manipulated applicants’ GPA, gender, and college major. Although GPA matters little for men, women benefit from moderate achievement but not high achievement. As a result, high-achieving men are called back significantly more often than high-achieving women—at a rate of nearly 2-to-1.
  3. Stalled for Whom? Change in the Division of Particular Housework Tasks and Their Consequences for Middle- to Low-Income Couples

    Whether the gender revolution has transformed couple behavior across all social classes is the subject of ongoing scholarly debate. The authors explore cohort change in the performance of individual routine and nonroutine housework tasks among middle- to low-income couples as well as their association with several aspects of relationship quality. Data are from the second wave (1992–1994) of the National Survey of Families and Households and the 2006 Marital and Relationship Survey.
  4. Sexual Orientation and Social Attitudes

    Gender, race, and class strongly predict social attitudes and are at the core of social scientific theory and empirical analysis. Sexuality (i.e., sexual orientation), however, is not as central a factor by which we conceptualize and systematize society. This study examines the impact of sexual orientation, gender, race, and education across attitudinal topics covered by the General Social Survey.

  5. Emasculation, Conservatism, and the 2016 Election

    If men can respond to a threat to their masculinity by refusing to do the dishes, doing push-ups, or going to a more fundamentalist church, why not respond by espousing certain political views or favoring certain candidates?
  6. Do Black Lives Increasingly Matter?

    Christopher Todd Beer on trends in police killings of unarmed citizens.
  7. Queer Pop-Ups

    Amin Ghaziani and Ryan Stillwagon on temporary spaces of queer community-building.
  8. The Art of Trans Politics

    Emmanuel David on contemporary artist Cassils’s embodied struggle and trans politics.
  9. Evolving Perspectives on Coastal Resilience

    Evolving Perspectives on Coastal Resilience

  10. Gender, Punishment, and Cooperation: Men Hurt Others to Advance Their Interests

    A laboratory experiment reports on gender, cooperation, and punishment in two public goods games using high-powered punishment. In a public goods games with punishment, no statistically significant differences between men and women are reported. In a modified game that includes an explicit payoff for relative performance, men punish more than women, men obtain higher rank, and punishment by males decreases payoffs for both men and women. These results contribute to the debate about the origins and maintenance of cooperation.