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  1. A Social Space Approach to Testing Complex Hypotheses: The Case of Hispanic Marriage Patterns in the United States

    A Social Space Approach to Testing Complex Hypotheses: The Case of Hispanic Marriage Patterns in the United States
  2. Punishment, Religion, and the Shrinking Welfare State for the Very Poor in the United States, 1970–2010

    Punishment, Religion, and the Shrinking Welfare State for the Very Poor in the United States, 1970–2010
  3. American Religion, All or Nothing at All

    Most Contexts readers will know that in recent years Americans became less attached to organized religion. The 2016 General Social Survey (GSS) estimated that 22% of adults preferred no religion, up from 21% in 2014, 14% in 2004, 9% in 1994, and 7% in both 1984 and 1974. This strong trend invites the inference that American religion is declining rapidly. But no single trend can give a complete view of a complicated institution. The rise of the “nones” is interesting, in part, because it is the most extreme evidence of religious decline in the United States.

  4. Support for Beauty-Status Exchange Remains Illusory

    American Sociological Review, Volume 82, Issue 5, Page 1100-1110, October 2017.
  5. Traditional, Modern, and Post-Secular Perspectives on Science and Religion in the United States

    Using General Social Survey data, we examine perspectives on science and religion in the United States. Latent class analysis reveals three groups based on knowledge and attitudes about science, religiosity, and preferences for certain religious interpretations of the world. The traditional perspective (43 percent) is marked by a preference for religion compared to science; the modern perspective (36 percent) holds the opposite view. A third perspective, which we call post-secular (21 percent), views both science and religion favorably.

  6. Marrying Social Activism and Spiritual Seeking

    Eve Fox speaks with Elizabeth Lesser about founding a prominent center for holistic learning.

  7. Love Wins?

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 1, Page 30-35, Winter 2016.
  8. Muslim Punk in an Alt-Right Era

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 3, Page 63-65, Summer 2017.
  9. Commuter Spouses and the Changing American Family

    the rise of commuter marriage reflects decades of social change in women’s workplace participation, american individualism, technological saturation, bureaucratic hurdles, and the symbolic significance of marriage itself.

  10. Moving a Mountain: The Extraordinary Trajectory of Same-Sex Marriage Approval in the United States

    Most public opinion attitudes in the United States are reasonably stable over time. Using data from the General Social Survey and the American National Election Studies, I quantify typical change rates across all attitudes. I quantify the extent to which change in same-sex marriage approval (and liberalization in attitudes toward gay rights in general) are among a small set of rapid changing outliers in surveyed public opinions. No measured public opinion attitude in the United States has changed more and more quickly than same-sex marriage.