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  1. Black Lives and Police Tactics Matter

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 3, Page 20-25, Summer 2017.
  2. Addicted to Hate: Identity Residual among Former White Supremacists

    The process of leaving deeply meaningful and embodied identities can be experienced as a struggle against addiction, with continuing cognitive, emotional, and physiological responses that are involuntary, unwanted, and triggered by environmental factors. Using data derived from a unique set of in-depth life history interviews with 89 former U.S. white supremacists, as well as theories derived from recent advances in cognitive sociology, we examine how a rejected identity can persist despite a desire to change.
  3. Unemployment, Trust in Government, and Satisfaction with Democracy: An Empirical Investigation

    Evidence suggests that unemployment negatively affects various aspects of individuals’ lives. The author investigates whether unemployment changes individuals’ political evaluations in the form of trust in government and satisfaction with democracy. While most research in this area operates on the macro level, the author provides individual-level evidence. In doing so, the author investigates the assumed causal link with panel data from Switzerland and the Netherlands.

  4. Book Review: Journey into Social Activism: Qualitative Approaches

    In a preliminary content analysis of articles in the top social movement journals, Atkinson finds that scholars of social activism typically use a broad range of qualitative research methodologies. However, scholars of activism rarely elaborate on the methods they use. Similarly, previous research has largely failed to bring together and critically assess the qualitative methodologies used to study social activism.
  5. “An Earnest Desire for the Truth despite Its Possible Unpleasantness”: A Comparative Analysis of the Atlanta University Publications and American Journal of Sociology, 1895 to 1917

    The authors examine the methodological sophistication of the research conducted by the W.E.B. Du Bois–led Atlanta Sociological Laboratory (ASL), the first American school of sociology, and Albion Small–edited American Journal of Sociology (AJS). Comparative analysis of the ASL publications and scholarly articles in AJS between 1895 and 1917 is undertaken to identify articulations of the method(s) of research offered in both. The authors conclude that the articulation of research methods by the ASL is superior to those from AJS.
  6. A New Political Generation: Millennials and the Post-2008 Wave of Protest

    Building on Karl Mannheim’s theory of generations, this address argues that U.S. Millennials comprise a new political generation with lived experiences and worldviews that set them apart from their elders. Not only are they the first generation of “digital natives,” but, although they are more educated than any previous U.S. generation, they face a labor market in which precarity is increasingly the norm.
  7. Why Is There No Labor Party in the United States? Political Articulation and the Canadian Comparison, 1932 to 1948

    Why is there no labor party in the United States? This question has had deep implications for U.S. politics and social policy. Existing explanations use "reflection" models of parties, whereby parties reflect preexisting cleavages or institutional arrangements. But a comparison with Canada, whose political terrain was supposedly more favorable to labor parties, challenges reflection models.

  8. Protest Campaigns and Movement Success: Desegregating the U.S. South in the Early 1960s

    Can protest bring about social change? Although scholarship on the consequences of social movements has grown dramatically, our understanding of protest influence is limited; several recent studies have failed to detect any positive effect. We investigate sit-in protest by black college students in the U.S. South in 1960, which targeted segregated lunch counters.

  9. International Human Rights and Domestic Income Inequality: A Difficult Case of Compliance in World Society

    Much research finds that human rights treaties fail to improve domestic practices unless governments are held accountable in some fashion. The implication is that noncompliance can be attributed to insincere commitments and willful disobedience. I challenge this claim for a core but overlooked treaty: the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights (ICESCR). Few analysts have studied the ICESCR because its terms are difficult to implement and suitable measures for judging compliance are hard to find.

  10. It’s Better to be Angry Together

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 4, Page 52-59, Fall 2017.