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  1. Committing Mass Violence to Education and Learning

    Laura E. Agnich and Meghan Hale on the rational, if overblown, fears reconfiguring classrooms.

  2. Saving Our Kids

    Reviewing Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis.

  3. My Debt to the Nepali People

    A researcher on ethnographic dharma after disaster in Nepal.

  4. Romancing the Data

    A review of Aziz Ansari and Erik Klinenberg’s Modern Romance.

  5. Torture and Scientism

    Steven Ward on two reports revealing the insidious instrumentalism of a social science.

  6. Antwerp’s Appetite for African Hands

    Contexts, Volume 15, Issue 4, Page 65-67, Fall 2016.
  7. The Analytic Lenses of Ethnography

    It is almost axiomatic that there are two contrasting theoretical approaches to ethnography: induction and deduction. However, regardless of whether ethnographers build theory from observations (induction) or use observations to test theory (deduction), they approach the field armed with one or more particular analytic lens that leads them to focus on a distinct thread of the social fabric. We outline the suite of analytic lenses that typify ethnography and identify eight ideal types.
  8. The Condensed Courtship Clock: How Elite Women Manage Self-development and Marriage Ideals

    As elite, heterosexual women delay marriage, complete higher education, and pursue high-status careers, are they able to de-center the other-oriented roles of wife and mother in their lives? Using in-depth interviews with 33 single, college-educated women, the authors examine how elite women balance expectations for self-development and family formation. Participants constructed a timeline with three phases: the self-development phase, the readiness moment, and the push to partner. Women’s initial focus on self-development ends with a shift toward feeling ready to search for a spouse.
  9. On the Weak Mortality Returns of the Prison Boom: Comparing Infant Mortality and Homicide in the Incarceration Ledger

    The justifications for the dramatic expansion of the prison population in recent decades have focused on public safety. Prior research on the efficacy of incarceration offers support for such claims, suggesting that increased incarceration saves lives by reducing the prevalence of homicide. We challenge this view by arguing that the effects of mass incarceration include collateral infant mortality consequences that call into question the number of lives saved through increased imprisonment.
  10. U.S. has 5 percent of world's population, but had 31 percent of its public mass shooters from 1966-2012

    Despite having only about 5 percent of the world's population, the United States was the attack site for a disproportionate 31 percent of public mass shooters globally from 1966-2012, according to research presented at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).