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  1. Women’s-Group Fishponds in Bangladesh

    In this article, the authors assess the impact of a fish polyculture program introduced through women-only groups on the gender asset gap among households in the Jessore District of Bangladesh. The analysis is framed using gender structure theory to examine the ways individual, interactional, and macro forces shape the asset gap as a key gender equity outcome. The authors find that participation in the fishpond program, as a mechanism at the macro dimension of the gender structure, was associated with an increase in the gender asset gap over time.
  2. Paternal Incarceration and Teachers’ Expectations of Students

    In the past 40 years, paternal imprisonment has been transformed from an event affecting only the most unfortunate children to one that one in four African American children experience. Although research speculates that the stigma, strain, and separation resulting from paternal incarceration cause the poor outcomes of children of incarcerated fathers, evidence regarding these mechanisms is lacking.
  3. Testing a Digital Inequality Model for Online Political Participation

    Increasing Internet use is changing the way individuals take part in society. However, a general mobilizing effect of the Internet on political participation has been difficult to demonstrate. This study takes a digital inequality perspective and analyzes the role of Internet expertise for the social structuration of online political participation. Analyses rely on two nationally representative surveys in Switzerland and use cluster analysis and structural equation modeling. A distinct group of political online participants emerged characterized by high education and income.
  4. Public Assistance, Relationship Context, and Jail for Child Support Debt

    Previous studies of poverty governance have focused on the welfare system, the criminal justice system, and the connections between them. Yet less attention has been paid to a third institution that bridges the gap between these two systems: child support enforcement. Jailing for child support nonpayment is one of many mechanisms of child support enforcement, but little is known about this tactic.
  5. Men as Dependents? Marriage and Changes in Health Insurance Coverage among Working-age Adults in the United States, 1988 to 2008

    Changes in marriage and employment patterns may have affected health insurance coverage rates differently for women and men. The author investigates changes in health insurance coverage between 1988 and 2008, focusing on employersponsored insurance (ESI) dependent and employee coverage. Using Oaxaca-Blinder decompositions and Current Population Survey data, the author finds that married men’s coverage as dependents increased from 1988 to 2008, but a smaller share of men were married in 2008. Coupled with declines in ESI employee coverage, changes in marriage increased men’s uninsurance rate.
  6. The Algorithmic Rise of the “Alt-Right”

    As with so many technologies, the Internet’s racism was programmed right in—and it’s quickly fueled the spread of White supremacist, xenophobic rhetoric throughout the western world.
  7. (Good) Debt is an Asset

    Raphael Charron-Chenier and Louise Seamster on debt and social inequality.
  8. Can Reducing Income Inequality Decouple Economic Growth from CO2 Emissions?

    In the past two decades, income inequality has steadily increased in most developed nations. During this same period, the growth rate of CO2 emissions has declined in many developed nations, cumulating to a recent period of decoupling between economic growth and CO2 emissions. The aim of the present study is to advance research on socioeconomic drivers of CO2 emissions by assessing how the distribution of income affects the relationship between economic growth and CO2 emissions.
  9. Anticipatory Minority Stressors among Same-sex Couples: A Relationship Timeline Approach

    The authors build on previous stress theories by drawing attention to the concept of anticipatory couple-level minority stressors (i.e., stressors expected to occur in the future that emanate from the stigmatization of certain relationship forms). A focus on anticipatory couple-level minority stressors brings with it the potential for important insight into vulnerabilities and resiliencies of people in same-sex relationships, the focus of this study. The authors use relationship timelines to examine stressors among a diverse sample of same-sex couples (n = 120).
  10. Risky Investments: How Local and Foreign Investors Finesse Corruption-Rife Emerging Markets

    How do investors enter and navigate markets where there is a general lack of access to information and where the law is open to interpretation? Drawing on interview data with 100 research subjects in Vietnam’s real estate market, this article makes contributions to the literatures of economic sociology and development. First, looking at a diverse set of local, regional, and global investors, I theorize how market actors pursue different strategies to manage risky investments based on their proximity to state officials.