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  1. Study Finds Changes to Retirement Savings System May Exacerbate Economic Inequality

    A shift to defined-contribution retirement plans, such as 401(k) plans, has led to an income and education gap in pension savings that could exacerbate future economic inequality, according to a study that was presented at the 111th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

  2. Is Sex Good for Your Health? A National Study on Partnered Sexuality and Cardiovascular Risk among Older Men and Women

    Working from a social relationship and life course perspective, we provide generalizable population-based evidence on partnered sexuality linked to cardiovascular risk in later life using national longitudinal data from the National Social Life, Health and Aging Project (NSHAP) (N = 2,204). We consider characteristics of partnered sexuality of older men and women, particularly sexual activity and sexual quality, as they affect cardiovascular risk. Cardiovascular risk is defined as hypertension, rapid heart rate, elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), and general cardiovascular events.

  3. Study Suggests Sex in Later Years Harmful to Men’s Heart Health, But Not Women’s

    Having sex frequently — and enjoying it — puts older men at higher risk for heart attacks and other cardiovascular problems. For older women, however, good sex may actually lower the risk of hypertension.

    That’s according to the first large-scale study of how sex affects heart health in later life. The federally funded research, led by a Michigan State University (MSU) scholar, appears in the September issue of the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

  4. Doing Sociology: Manisha Desai and Zakia Salime

    ASA speaks with sociologists Manisha Desai and Zakia Salime at the 2016 ASA Annual Meeting on August, 2016, in Seattle, WA. Desai and Salime talk about what it means to “do sociology,” how they use sociology in their work, highlights of their work in the field, the relevance of sociological work to society, and their advice to students interested in entering the field. 

  5. Careers in Sociology: Steve Ressler

    Companies Want to Hire Creative Problem Solvers

    BA and MA in Sociology
    Founder and CEO, GovLoop.com

  6. Careers in Sociology: Emily Larson

    When Congress Asks Questions, We Help Provide Answers

    BA in Sociology, MA in Public Policy
    Senior Analyst, Government Accountability Office

  7. Careers in Sociology: Marcus Pruitt

    Immerse Yourself in Internships

    BA in Sociology
    County Employee, Graduate Student

    Currently, I work in the travel and tourism sector of county government. Interacting with people from many different places is one thing I particularly enjoy. I am also a graduate student and a graduate research assistant. My sociology background has greatly aided my graduate school pursuits. My training in how to use the current literature, methodology, and data analysis has helped me transition into a better researcher.

  8. Going Underground: The Origins of Divergent Forms of Labor Parties in Recently Democratized Countries

    This study explores how different forms of civic solidarity emerge during authoritarian eras and how they evolve into diverse labor-based political institutions after transitions to democracy. I initially explore the modes of choices that radical intellectuals make—go underground or cooperate—in their responses to coercion and co-optation by authoritarian elites.

  9. Manufacturing Gender Inequality in the New Economy: High School Training for Work in Blue-Collar Communities

    Tensions between the demands of the knowledge-based economy and remaining, blue-collar jobs underlie renewed debates about whether schools should emphasize career and technical training or college-preparatory curricula. We add a gendered lens to this issue, given the male-dominated nature of blue-collar jobs and women’s greater returns to college. Using the ELS:2002, this study exploits spatial variation in school curricula and jobs to investigate local dynamics that shape gender stratification.

  10. Racial Capitalism and the Crisis of Black Masculinity

    In this article, I theorize "complicit masculinity" to examine how access to capital, in other words, making or spending money, mediates masculine identity for un- and underemployed black men. Arguing that hegemony operates around producer-provider norms of masculinity and through tropes of blackness within a system of racial capitalism, I show how complicity underscores the reality of differential aspirational models in the context of severe un- and underemployment and the failure of the classic breadwinner model for black men globally.