American Sociological Association

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  1. Discrimination, Sexual Harassment, and the Impact of Workplace Power

    Research on workplace discrimination has tended to focus on a singular axis of inequality or a discrete type of closure, with much less attention to how positional and relational power within the employment context can bolster or mitigate vulnerability. In this article, the author draws on nearly 6,000 full-time workers from five waves of the General Social Survey (2002–2018) to analyze discrimination, sexual harassment, and the extent to which occupational status and vertical and horizontal workplace relations matter.

  2. Cabdrivers and Their Fares: Temporal Structures of a Linking Ecology

    The author argues that behind the apparent randomness of interactions between cabdrivers and their fares in Warsaw is a temporal structure. To capture this temporal structure, the author introduces the notion of a linking ecology. He argues that the Warsaw taxi market is a linking ecology, which is structured by religious time, state time, and family time. The author then focuses on waiting time, arguing that it too structures the interactions between cabdrivers and their fares.

  3. Transparency and Embodied Action: Turn Organization and Fairness in Complex Institutional Environments

    Institutional settings in which large numbers of participants have the right and in some cases the responsibility to contribute to the proceedings pose particular challenges to the order and allocation of turns. These challenges are organizational, how to enable and order participation between large numbers of people, as well as moral and political—the fair, transparent, and even distribution of access to the floor.
  4. Racial Mismatch in the Classroom: Beyond Black-white Differences

    Previous research demonstrates that students taught by teachers of the same race and ethnicity receive more positive behavioral evaluations than students taught by teachers of a different race/ethnicity. Many researchers view these findings as evidence that teachers, mainly white teachers, are racially biased due to preferences stemming from racial stereotypes that depict some groups as more academically oriented than others.

  5. After Moving to Opportunity: How Moving to a Low-poverty Neighborhood Improves Mental Health among African American Women

    A large body of nonexperimental literature finds residing in a disadvantaged neighborhood is deleterious for mental health, and recent evidence from the Moving to Opportunity (MTO) program—a social experiment giving families living in high-poverty neighborhoods the opportunity to move to low-poverty neighborhoods—suggests a causal effect of moving to a low-poverty neighborhood on adult mental health. We use qualitative data from 67 Baltimore adults who signed up for the MTO program to understand how moving to a low-poverty neighborhood produced these mental health benefits.

  6. Understanding Racial-ethnic Disparities in Health: Sociological Contributions

    This article provides an overview of the contribution of sociologists to the study of racial and ethnic inequalities in health in the United States. It argues that sociologists have made four principal contributions. First, they have challenged and problematized the biological understanding of race. Second, they have emphasized the primacy of social structure and context as determinants of racial differences in disease. Third, they have contributed to our understanding of the multiple ways in which racism affects health.

  7. Stealing a Bag of Potato Chips and Other Crimes of Resistance

    Sociologist Victor M. Rios shows in his study how some young men make trouble as means of gaining respect. This excerpt is an adaptation from his book Punished: Policing the Lives of Black and Latino Boys.

  8. Featured Article: Struggling to Connect: White and Black Feminism in the Movement Years

    Why did an interracial feminist movement fail to develop in the United States? Were white feminists racist?

  9. Are Asian Americans Becoming "White"?

    Asian Americans have been labeled a “model minority” for their high rates of achievement, and some say they are on their way to becoming “white.” But these expectations can be a burden, and the predictions are surely premature. Even today, many Americans see Asians as “forever foreign.”

  10. Public Concern about Terrorism: Fear, Worry, and Support for Anti-Muslim Policies

    In the era of 9/11, terrorist attacks occur with sufficient frequency and lethality to constitute a realistic threat to the well-being of the American public. Sensing this concern, politicians emphasize the threat of violent attacks to advance a platform of making public safety a priority. In this context, the authors assess the extent, sources, and emotional impact of the public’s concern about terrorism. On the basis of a national survey of 1,000 Americans, the authors examine levels of fear of a terrorist attack and worry about terrorism relative to other potential harms.