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  1. Community and the Crime Decline: The Causal Effect of Local Nonprofits on Violent Crime

    Largely overlooked in the theoretical and empirical literature on the crime decline is a long tradition of research in criminology and urban sociology that considers how violence is regulated through informal sources of social control arising from residents and organizations internal to communities. In this article, we incorporate the “systemic” model of community life into debates on the U.S. crime drop, and we focus on the role that local nonprofit organizations played in the national decline of violence from the 1990s to the 2010s.
  2. Interdependent Career Types and Divergent Standpoints on the Use of Advanced Technology in Medicine

    This paper uses the case of the uneven use of a robotic technology to explain how physicians with similar training come to engage in different medical practices. I develop a conceptual framework in which their decisions to use advanced technologies are informed by “interdependent career types,” a concept that incorporates features of the professional social context of physicians’ work and the expertise they use, and reflects how medicine distributes expertise via formal and informal referral structures.
  3. Cultural Guides, Cultural Critics: Distrust of Doctors and Social Support during Mental Health Treatment

    Research on relationships and health often interprets culture as the passively transmitted “content” of social ties, an approach that overlooks the influence of cultural resources on relationships themselves. I propose that mental health patients seek social support partly based on cultural resources held by their network members, including members’ medical knowledge and beliefs. I test hypotheses using data from the Indianapolis Network Mental Health Study, an egocentric network survey of new mental health patients (N = 152) and their personal relationships (N = 1,868).
  4. Race, Class, and the Framing of Drug Epidemics

    by Rebecca Tiger in the Fall 2017 Contexts

    As America’s opiate epidemic rages on, calls for “treatment not punishment” dominate the national media. The hypocrisy of this response is not lost on a range of commentators: the reported move away from criminalization, they argue, is yet another example of racist drug policy. White people get treatment and poor people of color get punishment. Again.

  5. Review Essays: Little Shop of Horrors? A Digital Age Startup’s Experiment with Radical Transparency

    TechCo, the conversational firm at the center of Catherine Turco’s ethnography, is a fast-growing social media marketing company. Turco opens The Conversational Firm: Rethinking Bureaucracy in the Age of Social Media by introducing the founders of the firm, Eric and Anil, whose mission is “radical openness” in the service of succeeding in the digital economy (p. 15). Eric and Anil believe their organization must be nimble, responding directly and personally to their business customers through social media of all types.
  6. Same Trailer, Different Park

    The transience of community in a mobile home park.

  7. Can New Media Save the Book?

    The New Books Network is using new media to stoke interest in books across a range of disciplines.

  8. Attention for Sale

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 2, Page 60-61, Spring 2017.
  9. Glory and Gore

    Who’s the most important character in the Iliad? That depends. Using the poem, Rossman illustrates how to understand related but conceptually distinct concepts through social network analysis.

  10. Commuter Spouses and the Changing American Family

    the rise of commuter marriage reflects decades of social change in women’s workplace participation, american individualism, technological saturation, bureaucratic hurdles, and the symbolic significance of marriage itself.