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  1. Contexts: Science in Society

    Fall 2015 Vol. 14 No. 4

    The social and political entanglements of science, from climate change and medical marijuana to the origins of modern American sociology.

  2. Youth Cyberbullying Among Current or Former Friends and Dating Partners

    Youth cyberbullying is dramatically more likely to occur between current or former friends and dating partners than between students who were never friends or in a romantic relationship.

  3. Dating in the Time of #BlackLivesMatter: Exploring Mixed-race Women’s Discourses of Race and Racism

    The author explores the discourses and logics that self-identified multiracial and multiethnic female online daters use to explain their own responses to social justice movements around race and racism in the United States. These women mobilize stances on the social movement Black Lives Matter (BLM) as a metric of racial progressiveness, articulating their own political views on race. Furthermore, mixed-black women in particular describe using attitudes toward the BLM movement as a way to vet potential dating partners.

  4. Understanding Race After Charlottesville

    Race and white supremacy - topics many sociologists devote a great deal of research to and know well - have, again, become front page topics after violence broke out in Charlottesville last month. On Monday, September 18, the American Sociological Association, American Historical Association, American Anthropological Association, and Society for Applied Anthropology

  5. The Neighborhood Context of Latino Threat

    In recent years, the size of the Latino immigrant population has swelled in communities throughout the United States. For decades, social scientists have studied how social context, particularly a minority group’s relative size, affects the sentiments of the dominant group. Using a random sample survey of five communities in suburban Chicago, the authors examine the impact of Latino population concentration on native-born white residents’ subjective perceptions of threat from Latino immigrants at two micro-level geographies: the immediate block and the surrounding blocks.
  6. Managing the “Dirty Work” of Illegality

    Drawing on in-depth interviews with 45 Latinos living in a small city the author calls Sycamore City, the author examines the discourses and practices through which Mexican migrants and Puerto Ricans deal with the “dirty work” of illegality. The focus is on the “physical dirty work” performed by undocumented workers and “social dirty work” performed by workers on the margins of citizenship. This research shows that “physical dirty work” and “social dirty work” overlap when a new class of worker enters the labor market.
  7. Relationships between the Public and Crimmigration Entities in North Carolina: A 287(g) Program Focus

    How does local law enforcement, with the aid of city and county governments, respond to racialized immigrant threat through policy implementation, namely, through adoption of intergovernmental agreements? More specifically, how is this response tailored for Latino immigrant communities, particularly in new destination communities?
  8. Perpetual Inferiority: Whites’ Racial Ideology toward Latinos

    The author examines contemporary Latino racialization by focusing on whites’ attitudes toward Latinos. Drawing on 40 in-depth interviews with whites from Orange County, California, the findings show that this group of white Americans believes that Latino culture is deficient and inferior. Moreover, the respondents explicitly ascribe these problems to the group as a whole, regardless of national origin, citizenship status, or generation.
  9. Third Generation Disadvantage among Mexican Americans

    Among Mexican Americans, generational differences in education do not fit with assimilation theory’s predictions of significant improvement from the second to third generation; instead, education for third generation remains similar to the second generation and falls behind that of non-Hispanic whites. Scholars have not examined this educational gap for recent cohorts, nor have they considered a wide range of economic outcomes by generation.
  10. Mexican American Faculty in Research Universities: Can the Next Generation Beat the Odds?

    Mexican Americans represent the largest Latina/o subpopulation and have the lowest levels of educational attainment in the United States. Mexican Americans are underrepresented in all professional fields, including academia, and thus warrant attention.