American Sociological Association

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  1. Positions Advertised in the ASA Job Bank in 2018

    This report analyzes the position advertisements in the ASA Job Bank in 2018. 

  2. Task Force on Contingent Faculty Employment in Sociology Report Gets Strong Support from Council

    In early 2016, ASA Council appointed a task force “to explore the dynamics and implications of the recent growth of contingent employment among sociologists in the context of the broader structural transformations now underway in U.S. universities and in comparison to other disciplines.” And in March 2019, Council approved the final report from the Task Force on Contingent Faculty The task force was co-chaired by the late Dan Clawson and Louis Edgar Esparza, and included members Marisa Allison, Celeste Atkins, Michael Burawoy, Jay R.

  3. 2019 ASA Award Recipients

    The ASA will present the 2019 awards at this year’s Annual Meeting in New York City on August 11. Congratulations to all of our distinguished winners.

    W.E.B. Du Bois Career of Distinguished Scholarship Award

  4. Sexual Harassment Training: Promises, Pitfalls, and Future Directions

    Policy training is a popular tool for sexual harassment prevention because it is a simple and relatively affordable way to demonstrate symbolic com-pliance with antidiscrimination law. With the rise in national attention to sexual harassment, it's important to review what we know about the effec-tiveness of training. On the positive side, training can broaden people's knowledge and definitions of sexual harassment (Antecol and Cobb-Clark 2003), and communicate the seriousness with which an organization takes the issue.

  5. Can Anti-Harassment Programs Reduce Sexual Harassment?

    Do workplace sexual harassment programs help? We have now given training and grievance procedures a good two decades to work—most companies had them by 1998 when the Supreme Court endorsed them — and they don’t appear to have helped much. Surveys using probability samples showed that about 40 percent of women circa 1980 faced specific forms of “unwanted sexual attention” or “sexual coercion” at work, and recent surveys find similar rates (EEOC 2016). Workplaces with high gender equity are better, but they remain rare.