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  1. The [Un]Surprising Alt-Right

    by Robert Futrell and Pete Simi

    The night that Barack Obama was elected President in 2008, the White supremacist web forum Stormfront lit up with posts about racial extremists’ fantastical visions of violence to combat “White racial genocide.” On election night 2016, Stormfront lit up again as White supremacists expressed triumph with Donald Trump’s victory. They celebrated: “We finally have one of us in the White House again!”

  2. On Air: Sociologists Discuss Freedom of Speech on College Campuses

    The fight over campus speech has a long history, but recent events suggest it is at least as vitriolic as ever. Headlines are illustrative of how volatile campuses can be with mass protests leading to cancellations of speeches by invited speakers and threats made against academics such as Johnny Williams, a sociology professor at Trinity College. What constitutes acceptable speech on campus? When does it become hate speech? What rights should and do professors, students, and invited speakers have?

  3. Communicating Across Difference: Free and Responsible Speech

    Attacks on the speech of students, faculty, and visitors on college campuses have a long history. Not only are such attacks continuing, but social media has generated a climate in which campaigns of intimidation can be organized quickly and easily and the current political climate seems to have released the reins of restraint. Particularly troubling has been the disproportionate number of targets of intimidation campaigns who are scholars from historically marginalized populations, including people of color and members of the LGBTQ community.  

  4. Understanding Race After Charlottesville

    Race and white supremacy - topics many sociologists devote a great deal of research to and know well - have, again, become front page topics after violence broke out in Charlottesville last month. On Monday, September 18, the American Sociological Association, American Historical Association, American Anthropological Association, and Society for Applied Anthropology

  5. Summer 2017 Contexts Online Free until Nov. 4

    Letter from the Editors

    As we write, millions of Texans are struggling through a hurricane for which we had years of warning. The president took a break from bragging about how great the government’s response to the hurricane was (it wasn’t) to pardon a racist sheriff who waged a campaign of state-sponsored terror against immigrants. Trump reiterated that transgender personnel are to be kicked out of the military, while Trump’s generals renewed the military’s commitment to never-ending war in Afghanistan. And that’s just one weekend in August.

  6. Black lives and police tactics matter

    by Rory Kramer, Brianna Remster, and Camille Z. Charles in the Summer 2017 Contexts

  7. Fall 2017 Contexts Online Free until January 12

    Letter from the Editors

    Now it’s time to say goodbye,

    To all our company…

    So after 12 spectacular issues, lots of great web-only content, and a new edition of The Contexts Reader on the way, we’re heading into the sunset to make way for the new editors, Rashawn Ray and Fabio Rojas.

  8. ASA Fights Against Adding Citizenship Question to Census

    The Trump Administration has announced that a question on citizenship status will be included on the 2020 Census.  This will fundamentally compromise the integrity of the census. 

  9. Spring 2018 Contexts Online Free until July 15

    Letter from the Editors

    Education is a central feature of our lives. Collectively, our society invests billions of dollars in schools and colleges, with the hope that they act as transformative institutions that create a society of educated and productive citizens. Most of us will spend 12 to 16 years in school—often many more. And if we have children, we obsess over their homework, their schools’ scorecards, and the doors education will open for each generation.