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  1. Journeys in Sociology: From First Encounters to Fulfilling Retirements

    Edited by Rosalyn Benjamin Darling and Peter J. Stein.

    The editors and twenty contributors to the essential anthology Journeys in Sociology use a life-course perspective to address the role of sociology in their lives. The power of their personal experiences—during the Great Depression, World War II, or the student protests and social movements in the 1960s and '70s—magnify how and why social change prompted these men and women to study sociology. Moreover, all of the contributors include a discussion of their activities in retirement. 

  2. A Position with a View

    The differentiation of occupations is of central concern to stratification scholars studying class and mobility, yet little is known about how individuals actually see the occupational landscape. Sociologists have long collected data on individual perceptions of where occupations stand relative to one another, but these data are rarely used to study the logics that individuals employ when categorizing occupations. Using the 1989 GSS occupational prestige module, we investigate how cognitive maps of the occupational hierarchy vary in terms of content and structure.
  3. The Effects of Gendered Occupational Roles on Men’s and Women’s Workplace Authority: Evidence from Microfinance

    The Effects of Gendered Occupational Roles on Men’s and Women’s Workplace Authority: Evidence from Microfinance
  4. Rising Intragenerational Occupational Mobility in the United States, 1969 to 2011

    American Sociological Review, Volume 82, Issue 3, Page 568-599, June 2017.
  5. The New Closed Shop? The Economic and Structural Effects of Occupational Licensure

    The New Closed Shop? The Economic and Structural Effects of Occupational Licensure
  6. Study: Banks Hired Risk Officers to Mitigate Risk in Years Before Collapse. It Didn’t Go So Well

    New research suggests a significant number of national and international American banks hired new Chief Risk Officers to mitigate risk but may have actually helped lead the industry into widespread insolvency.

    Starting in the 1990s, many major banks hired Chief Risk Officers (CROs) in a response to new laws and regulations put in place following financial meltdowns in the 1980s. In an effort to comply, banking officials elevated risk analysts to corner offices to show they were serious about tackling risk.

  7. ASA Task Force on Contingent Faculty Interim Report

    The ASA Task Force on Contingent Faculty was appointed to address the changes in faculty employment and working conditions, career prospects for graduate students, and the consequences for higher education that have resulted from the increased reliance on contingent faculty. Contingent faculty, both part-time and full-time non-tenure track, have increased dramatically. By 2011 a majority of faculty were employed part-time.  Contingent faculty are least common at Ph.D.

  8. Men in Caring Occupations: Doing Gender Differently

    As there is less written about men in occupations where the majority of workers are women than the reverse, I was looking forward to reading Men in Caring Occupations, especially regarding the four occupations covered—airplane cabin crew, nurses, primary school teachers, and librarians. The focus of the book is how men “negotiate the potential mismatch between the (feminine) nature of the job and a gendered (masculine) identity” (p. 4-5). As the minority group in these occupations, men need to practice their caring skills, but need not feminize as workers.

  9. The Effects of Gendered Occupational Roles on Men’s and Women’s Workplace Authority

    Research from the American Sociological Review finds gender stereotyping of jobs disadvantages both women and men.

    It’s well established that people associate certain jobs with gender. Firefighters are male and nurses are female, for example. But what if an occupation, because it’s new to society, is viewed as neither male nor female?

  10. Ideology and Threat Assessment: Law Enforcement Evaluation of Muslim and Right-Wing Extremism

    Does ideology affect assessment of the threat of violent extremism? A survey of law enforcement agencies in the United States in 2014 offers a comparison suggesting a small but statistically significant effect: Political attitudes were correlated with assessment of threats posed by Muslim extremists, and threat assessment was not correlated with the number of Muslim Americans who had engaged in violent extremism within the agency’s jurisdiction.