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  1. Elements of Professional Expertise: Understanding Relational and Substantive Expertise through Lawyers' Impact

    Lawyers keep the gates of public justice institutions, particularly through their roles in formal procedures like hearings and trials. Yet, it is not clear what lawyers do in such quintessentially legal settings: conclusions from past research are bedeviled by a lack of clear theory and inconsistencies in research design. Conceptualizing litigation work in terms of professional expertise, I conduct a theoretically grounded synthesis of the findings of extant studies of lawyers’ impact on civil case outcomes.

  2. Portland Oregon, Music Scenes, and Change: A Cultural Approach to Collective Strategies of Empowerment

    This article highlights the role of the independent music culture of Portland, Oregon, in establishing a productive culture of consumption and spaces that contribute to the place character of the city. Derived from an ethnographic research project of urban culture and social change in Portland, Oregon, guided interviews and extended participant observation helped to bring to light the cultural economy that artists and musicians make for the city.

  3. Scorn Wars: Rural White People and Us

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 1, Page 58-62, Winter 2016.
  4. Dorothea Lange and the Art of the Caption

    How Depression Era photographer Dorothea Lange helped pioneer sociological storytelling with her evocative captions.

  5. RaceBaitR Talks #HistoryByHillary, Queerness

    Steven W. Thrasher and genderqueer activist Hari Ziyad on calling out hypocrisy and fighting racism without engaging racists.

  6. Weiners Galore

    Contexts, Volume 15, Issue 4, Page 67-69, Fall 2016.
  7. Girls Rock the Stage and Smash the Patriarchy

    Trisha L. Crawshaw on a rock camp helping eqip kids to resist gender norms, acknowledge privilege, and confront racism.

  8. Muslim Punk in an Alt-Right Era

    Contexts, Volume 16, Issue 3, Page 63-65, Summer 2017.
  9. The Emergence of Statistical Objectivity: Changing Ideas of Epistemic Vice and Virtue in Science

    The meaning of objectivity in any specific setting reflects historically situated understandings of both science and self. Recently, various scientific fields have confronted growing mistrust about the replicability of findings, and statistical techniques have been deployed to articulate a “crisis of false positives.” In response, epistemic activists have invoked a decidedly economic understanding of scientists’ selves. This has prompted a scientific social movement of proposed reforms, including regulating disclosure of “backstage” research details and enhancing incentives for replication.
  10. White Integration or Segregation? The Racial and Ethnic Transformation of Rural and Small Town America

    Rural America has seemingly been “left behind” in an era of massive immigration and growing diversity. The arrival of new immigrants has exposed many rural whites, perhaps for the first time, to racial and ethnic minority populations. Do rural whites increasingly live in racially diverse nonmetropolitan places? Or is white exposure to racially diverse populations expressed in uneven patterns of residential integration from place to place? We link microdata from the Panel Survey of Income Dynamics (1989‐to‐2009 waves) to place data identified in the 1990–2010 decennial censuses.