American Sociological Association

Search

Search

The search found 744 results in 0.022 seconds.

Search results

  1. More Than Half of 'Children' Misperceive or Reject Parents' Political Party Affiliations

    A new study finds that more than half of all "children" in the U.S. either misperceive or reject their parents' political party affiliations.

  2. Study Suggests Earning a College Degree Before, But Not After, Getting Married Protects Against Obesity

    People who earn a college degree before getting married are much less likely to become obese than those who graduate from college after getting married, according to a new study.

  3. Keep Your Enemies Close? Study Finds Greater Proximity to Opponents Leads to More Polarization

    Encouraging adversaries to have more interpersonal contact to find common ground may work on occasion, but not necessarily in the U.S. Senate, according to new research.

  4. Minorities' Homicide Victimization Rates Fall Significantly Compared to Whites'

    A new study reveals that while homicide victimization rates declined for whites, blacks, and Hispanics in the United States from 1990-2010, the drop was much more precipitous for the two minority groups.

  5. Polygamy and Alcohol Linked to Physical Abuse in African Marriages

    African women in polygamous marriages or with alcoholic husbands have a significantly higher risk of being physically abused by their husbands than women in monogamous marriages or women whose husbands don't abuse alcohol, new research shows.

  6. Pressure to 'Publish or Perish' May Discourage Innovative Research, Study Suggests

    The traditional pressure in academia for faculty to "publish or perish" advances knowledge in established areas. But it also might discourage scientists from asking the innovative questions that are most likely to lead to the biggest breakthroughs, according to a new study spearheaded by a UCLA professor.

  7. Study: Probation for Schools Spurs Transfer Patterns Linked to Family Income

    Schools placed on probation due to subpar test scores spurs transfer patterns linked to household income, a study by New York University (NYU) sociologists finds.

    Their study of a school accountability program in the Chicago Public Schools reveals that families were responsive to new information about school quality and that those with more financial resources were the most likely to transfer to other schools in the district or to leave the district altogether.

  8. Lightness/Darkness of Skin Affects Male Immigrants' Likelihood of Gaining Employment

    Skin color is a significant factor in the probability of employment for male immigrants to the United States, according to a new study by two University of Kansas (KU) researchers.

  9. Study Investigates Whether Blind People Characterize Others by Race

    Most people who meet a new acquaintance, or merely pass someone on the street, need only a glance to categorize that person as a particular race. But, sociologist Asia Friedman wondered, what can we learn about that automatic visual processing from people who are unable to see?

    Friedman, an assistant professor of sociology at the University of Delaware, set out to explore that question by interviewing 25 individuals who are blind. She will present her findings in a study at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).

  10. Unmarried Women: Politically Cohesive, More Concerned About Women's Status Than Married Counterparts

    Why do unmarried women tend to be more liberal and Democratic than their married counterparts? A key reason is because unmarried women — those who have never been married and those who are divorced — are more concerned about the status of women as a collective group, suggests a new study that will be presented at the 110th Annual Meeting of the American Sociological Association (ASA).