American Sociological Association

Review Essays: Sociology’s Messy Eating: Food, Consumer Choice, and Social Change

In 2002, the historian Warren Belasco remarked that while “food is important . . . food scholars may still evoke a sense of surprise” (Belasco 2002, pp. 2, 5). The sociological importance of food should be obvious: one need not be a Marxist to recognize that food production forms an essential infrastructure for other sorts of social activities, nor a Weberian to perceive the role of eating in status and social closure. And yet, at the time of Belasco’s writing, identifying one’s primary research area as “food” to colleagues at an ASA meeting could evoke a cocked eyebrow and an awkward pause.

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Authors

Michael A. Haedicke

Volume

46

Issue

4

Starting Page

397

Ending Page

402